Djinn Patrol on the Purple Line

This was one of the books I “discovered” through NPR’s 2020 book concierge after applying certain filters, and it was an enjoyable albeit sad read. The book focuses on poverty, religious conflicts, child labor, kidnappings, class/caste distinction, and the poor living conditions in slums or bastis in India through the eyes of various children, including…

The Box Man

This is the record of the box man. I am beginning this account in a box. A cardboard box that reaches just to my hips when I put it on over my head. That is to say, at this juncture the box man is me. A box man, in his box, is recording the chronicle…

The Vegetarian

The Vegetarian (Chaesikju-uija) by Han Kang is a South Korean novel that won the 2016 Man Booker International Prize. It is a short novel about a young woman, Yeong-Hye, who, after a strange dream, suddenly decides to become a vegetarian.  The novel is divided into three parts, each focusing on a different character. The first…

On Chesil Beach

Ian McEwan’s novels never fail to engage me, whether they are over 500 pages or under 200. The same can be said about his 2007 novella, On Chesil Beach, which is about the ill-fated wedding night of a young couple, Edward and Florence. Florence is a talented violinist, and Edward is a young historian, and…

The Sellout

I just finished Paul Beatty‘s The Sellout, which was the Man Booker Prize winner of 2016.  It’s a short, strange, witty novel that, though seemingly humorous, tackles very serious social and cultural issues. The novel starts with the protagonist, African-American Mr. Me, high on his homegrown marijuana at the Supreme Court of the United States,…

Sorcerer to the Crown

I feel a bit bad about not updating my blog. It’s been a while since I last posted a review, though I’ve only finished one book since.  I’ve been a bit busy with some freelance work, and now, with the Holiday season coming up, there’s always something that needs to be done.  But today, I…

The Woman in the Dunes

I’ve read a few novels written by Japanese writers, and though most of them are pretty strange, Kobo Abe‘s The Woman in the Dunes really takes the cake! Published in 1962, The Woman in the Dunes, or Suna no Onna (Sand Woman) in Japanese, tells the strange and horrifying tale of a man who goes…

A Fine Balance

I’ve been a bit remiss in updating my blog partly because of the Holidays and partly because a lot of things have happened in my life lately. However, a big part of it also has to do with laziness. I realized that I did not post a December Book Loot earlier this month either but…

Smaller and Smaller Circles

When the body of an adolescent boy is found, eviscerated with heart and penis cut off and face skinned, at a city landfill in Manila, it seemed like just another unfortunate though brutal crime.  But when bodies sharing the same signs and markings start showing up every month at the landfill, the head of the…

Far From the Madding Crowd

Before the name Everdene (spelled -deen) was popularized by a willful, bow-and-arrow-toting girl fighting against an oppressive government, it was the name of an equally strong, spirited, and independent young woman, Bathsheba Everdene, the heroine of Thomas Hardy’s novel Far From The Madding Crowd. Published anonymously in a monthly serial in 1874, Far From the…