Djinn Patrol on the Purple Line

This was one of the books I “discovered” through NPR’s 2020 book concierge after applying certain filters, and it was an enjoyable albeit sad read. The book focuses on poverty, religious conflicts, child labor, kidnappings, class/caste distinction, and the poor living conditions in slums or bastis in India through the eyes of various children, including…

A Fine Balance

I’ve been a bit remiss in updating my blog partly because of the Holidays and partly because a lot of things have happened in my life lately. However, a big part of it also has to do with laziness. I realized that I did not post a December Book Loot earlier this month either but…

The Hundred Foot Journey

So despite my earlier rant about being in a reading rut and contemplating whether or not to give up on the two books I’ve been reading, I pushed on and eventually finished Richard Morais’ The Hundred Foot Journey. Though not exactly a great piece of literature, The Hundred Foot Journey, it is, at least, not the worst…

The Case of the Man Who Died Laughing

India’s Most Private Investigator, Vish Puri and his slew of sleuths are back in Tarquin Hall‘s second book in the Vish Puri series, The Case of the Man who Died Laughing.   Like in the first novel, The Case of the Missing Servant, Vish Puri must solve a murder. But unlike the Case of the Missing…

Vish Puri: Confidentiality is His Watchword.

After reading a heavy-hitting novel like The Orphan Master’s Son, Tarquin Hall’s light and fun novel, The Case of the Missing Servant, is just what I was looking for. The Case of the Missing Servant (2009) is the first book in a series starring Vish Puri, India’s “most private investigator.”  The 51-year-old, rotund, Safari-suit-and-Sandown-hat-wearing, mustachioed…

At The Stroke of Midnight

What can’t be cured must be endured… And rightly so.  Because I was reading Midnight’s Children (Salman Rushdie) with a reading buddy, I couldn’t just stop, even if there were times when I wanted to, because Saleem, the novel’s gregarious narrator, had a way of beating around the bush. So I persevered, and finished reading the…

Buddy Reads: Midnight’s Children

Last week, I started reading Salman Rushdie’s Midnight’s Children with a “reading buddy” I “met” online.  I “discovered” my reading buddy, Angus, on wordpress, through his blog Book Rhapsody, but started the Reading Buddy activity in another forum. For reasons unknown to me, he had chosen to read Midnight’s Children to end the year, and since I’ve always wanted to read…

The Geography of Bliss

Everyone wants to find happiness, and Eric Weiner is no exception.  In his non-fiction / travel book, The Geography of Bliss, Eric, a self-proclaimed miserable grump, and former National Public Radio correspondent, tries to find happiness by looking for the happiest places on Earth. With the help of scientists from the World Database of Happiness,…

Last reads of 2010…

I’m a little late writing about the last two books I read in 2010.  Two books of quite different moods – the first, quite heavy, A Thousand Splendid Suns by Khaled Hosseini, and the second, to brighten my mood a bit, Haroun and the Sea of Stories, by Salman Rushdie.  A Thousand Splendid Suns by…

The Enchantress of Florence

“In the day’s last light the glowing lake below the palace-city looked like a sea of molten gold.” I didn’t think I would actually finish this wonderful book by Salman Rushdie.  To be honest, I find it quite difficult and intimidating to write a “review” about it.  Though I found the book quite enjoyable, I…