sellout

The Sellout

I just finished reading Paul Beatty‘s The Sellout, the Man Booker Prize winner of 2016.  It’s a short, strange, witty novel that, though seemingly humorous, tackles very serious social and cultural issues. The novel starts with the protagonist, a first name-less African-American Mr. Me, high on his homegrown marijuana at the Supreme Court of the…

sun

The Sun Also Rises

Ernest Hemingway‘s The Sun Also Rises is one of his most well-known, and well-loved novels.  Published in 1926, it is said to depict the life, ideals, and frustrations of the “Lost Generation” – intellectual young men and women enlightened during the years after World War I.  Hemingway himself was one of the “founding” members of…

orphans

When We Were Orphans

I’ve only read 3 Kazuo Ishiguro novels so far, all of which fall under different genres; the first one I read was his 2005 science-fiction novel, Never Let Me Go, followed  (many years later) by his Booker Prize-winning 1989 novel, The Remains of the Day, which is a Victorian / historical fiction, and just recently I…

GB

The Ghost Bride

In my review of Uprooted, I mentioned that I had learned about it from a list I stumbled upon about standalone novels for those who enjoy reading fantasy.  That’s also where I learned about Yangsze Choo’s 2013 novel, The Ghost Bride. The Ghost Bride is a novel about an ancient Chinese practice of marrying off the…

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The Woman in the Dunes

I’ve read a few novels written by Japanese writers, and though most of them were pretty strange, Kobo Abe‘s The Woman in the Dunes really takes the cake! Published in 1962, The Woman in the Dunes, or Suna no Onna (Sand Woman) in Japanese, tells the strange and horrifying tale of a man who goes…

cover

Smaller and Smaller Circles

When the body of an adolescent boy was found, eviscerated, with heart and penis cut off, and face skinned off at a city landfill in Manila, it seemed like just another unfortunate, though brutal crime.  But when bodies sharing the same traits and markings start showing up every month at the landfill, the head of…

death

Death and The Flower

The name Koji Suzuki might not ring a bell for most non-Japanese people, but they might be familiar with his horror novel The Ring, which was turned into a movie in Japan, and later, in the United States. The Japanese movie version of The Ring (and its sequel/prequel), was probably the scariest horror movie I’ve ever…

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The Hundred Foot Journey

So despite my earlier rant about being in a reading rut and contemplating whether or not to give up on the two books I’ve been reading, I pushed on and eventually finished Richard Morais’ The Hundred Foot Journey. Though not exactly a great piece of literature, The Hundred Foot Journey, it is, at least, not the worst…

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The Case of the Man Who Died Laughing

India’s Most Private Investigator, Vish Puri and his slew of sleuths are back in Tarquin Hall‘s second book in the Vish Puri series, The Case of the Man who Died Laughing.   Like in the first novel, The Case of the Missing Servant, Vish Puri must solve a murder. But unlike the Case of the Missing…