Tess of the D’Urbervilles

A few weeks ago, I had the sudden urge to read Thomas Hardy‘s Tess of the D’Urbervilles. I’ve heard of it before, but did not have a single idea what it was about.  The only other Thomas Hardy novel I’ve read is Far From the Madding Crowd, so when, for reasons unknown I suddenly wanted…

Lincoln in the Bardo

Before it won the Man Booker Prize in 2017, I had no intentions of ever reading George Saunders‘ first full-length novel, Lincoln in the Bardo.  I knew Saunders was known for his short stories, but short stories were never really my thing, so I had never read any of his works before.  The title of…

The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle

I’m going to celebrate my blog’s 7th anniversary by writing my 329th post!  Ok, I realize that number is nothing special, but, what the heck, right? Anyway, I didn’t realize that the last book I talked about on here was The House of the Spirits.  It seemed like forever since I finished that, but I…

The House of the Spirits

So, the latest book review I’ve been procrastinating on is Isabel Allende‘s (probably) most-well known novel, The House of the Spirits.  I finished reading this about a week ago, so I figured it’s time to finally write some kind of passable review about it. The House of the Spirits isn’t hard to read; it’s engaging,…

Back to the Classics Challenge: Anna Karenina

What can I say about Leo Tolstoy‘s Anna Karenina that hasn’t already been said by one reader or another?  It’s a long, complex, bittersweet novel about the lives of aristocratic families in Russia in the late 1800’s, summed up nicely in its famous opening lines:  “Happy families are all alike; every unhappy family is unhappy…

Litsy!

Hey guys, if you haven’t already!, download and try out Litsy, an app every book lover will love! Litsy is like a cross between goodreads and instagram. You can upload pictures of books and write blurbs, quotes, and short reviews. You can also upload books you’re currently reading, as well as books you want to…

The Sun Also Rises

Ernest Hemingway‘s The Sun Also Rises is one of his most well-known, and well-loved novels.  Published in 1926, it is said to depict the life, ideals, and frustrations of the “Lost Generation” – intellectual young men and women enlightened during the years after World War I.  Hemingway himself was one of the “founding” members of…