Djinn Patrol on the Purple Line

This was one of the books I “discovered” through NPR’s 2020 book concierge after applying certain filters, and it was an enjoyable albeit sad read. The book focuses on poverty, religious conflicts, child labor, kidnappings, class/caste distinction, and the poor living conditions in slums or bastis in India through the eyes of various children, including…

The Prisoner of Heaven

The Prisoner of Heaven is the third book in Carlos Ruiz Zafon‘s Cemetery of Forgotten Books series. The series consists of four novels, namely, The Shadow of the Wind, Angel’s Game, The Prisoner of Heaven, and the Labyrinth of Sprits, which doesn’t need to be read in chronological order. The series takes place in the…

A Pair of Blue Eyes

I’ve been so busy lately with work and other stuff that I nearly forgot about the last book I read, which is Thomas Hardy‘s A Pair of Blue Eyes.  While reading Tess of the D’Urbervilles, I resolved to read, if not all, then most of Thomas Hardy’s novels.  I don’t exactly know why I had…

Tess of the D’Urbervilles

A few weeks ago, I had the sudden urge to read Thomas Hardy‘s Tess of the D’Urbervilles. I’ve heard of it before but had no idea what it was about.  The only other Thomas Hardy novel I’ve read is Far From the Madding Crowd, so when, for reasons unknown, I suddenly wanted to read Tess…

Lincoln in the Bardo

Before it won the Man Booker Prize in 2017, I had no intention to read George Saunders‘ first full-length novel, Lincoln in the Bardo.  I knew Saunders is known for his short stories, but short stories were never really my thing, so I never read any of his works before.  The title of the novel,…

The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle

I’m going to celebrate my blog’s 7th anniversary by writing my 329th post!  Ok, I realize that number is nothing special but what the heck, right? Anyway, I didn’t realize that the last book I talked about on here was The House of the Spirits.  It seems like forever since I finished that book, but…

The House of the Spirits

So, the latest book review I’ve been procrastinating on is Isabel Allende‘s (probably) most well-known novel, The House of the Spirits.  I finished this book about a week ago, so I figured it’s time to finally write some kind of passable review about it. The House of the Spirits isn’t hard to read; it’s engaging,…

Back to the Classics Challenge: Anna Karenina

What can I say about Leo Tolstoy‘s Anna Karenina that hasn’t already been said by one reader or another?  It’s a long, complex, bittersweet novel about the lives of aristocratic families in Russia in the late 1800s, which is summed up nicely in its famous opening lines, “Happy families are all alike; every unhappy family…